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Fall of the Empire: Romanticism Through Dresses

During the short period when Neoclassicism and Romanticism co - existed, Romantic influence [on dress] was as easily detected as a drop of ink in water. Under its influence, the fashionable feminine silhouette underwent major transformations. Romantic sleeve shapes evolved out of straight - cuts into puffs, then demi-gigots, then massive full gigots, and then low, sunken balloons. Skirts inflated from a tall column to a wide, rounded arch. And quite notably, the waist was rediscovered. The waistline gradually fell from the empire position to the natural waist by the 1830s, and then settled into a low point by the 1840s.

That was just an excerpt from my article “Fall of the Empire: Romanticism Through Dresses,” published in the latest issue of Enchanted Living Magazine.

It’s all about The Romantics!

https://enchantedlivingmag.com



Image information:

  1. Dress, 1800 - 1805, American. Cotton and linen. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009.300.332 8

  2. Dress, circa 1820 (fabric from late 18th century), British. Silk. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Irene Lewisohn Bequest, 1971.242.1a – e

  3. Dress, circa 1825, British. Silk. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. F.D. Millet,13.49.21

  4. Walking dress , circa 1830, British. Cotton. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Irene Lewisohn Bequest, 1977.91.1

  5. Dress , circa 1836, British. Silk. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Irene Lewisohn Bequest, C.I.66.35.1

  6. Dress , circa 1837, American. Silk. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 37.192

  7. Dress , circa 1842, American or European. Silk. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1975.128.10

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